food, history 

This episode of The Dollop is quite a ride... Apparently mincemeat pie was such a big deal in the early US that it rose to the level of a social issue or moral panic. I'm just trying to imagine what it would taste like. Meat, fat, fruit and spices baked in a crust? eeeeehhh

food, history 

@interneteh I’ve had actual mincemeat pie with meat in it before. It’s definitely not a usual modern taste, but it’s not unpalatable I guess? The closest thing I could compare it to is barbecue, but with more of a “Christmas” flavor profile with the cinnamon, cloves, raisins, etc.

food, history 

@alpine_thistle In that case I'd probably like it. I do use "christmas" spices in savory cooking quite a bit. It just sounds very foreign, and I can't do dried fruit next to meat.

food, history 

@interneteh @alpine_thistle

Welcome to my wheelhouse;-) Mincemeat, in the sense, had meat. A lot of medieval cookery mixed what we think of as sweet and savoury spices. Fruit with meat protein was very much a thing. Like this - aspiringluddite.com/May11/Herb

food, history 

@AspiringLuddite @interneteh haha, I was also about to mention medieval palates 😂

Sometimes I’ll be eating modern food and taste or smell a combination of flavors/spices that “seems medieval.” This usually happens to me with either middle eastern dishes or spiced Christmas food—including mincemeat pie.

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food, history 

@alpine_thistle @interneteh

Poudre fort is, in many cases, not a far cry from five-spice powder - for some values of five spice, of course. It's also close-ish to quatre épices. My current down-and-dirty poudre fort (as outlined here - aspiringluddite.com/sca/0008.s) is black pepper, clove, and ginger. I've been using a pinch or two in my terrines lately. (Pork liver, capers, an egg or two, a little cream, and a pinch of poudre fort. Mmmm.)

I wonder if there's an article there?

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Medievalist

Medievalists and Medieval-adjacent. Sort-of.